In the News

The stories of Isle de Jean Charles and the National Disaster Resilience Competition have been covered by media, professionals and academics alike.
The links below represent many viewpoints, aggregated here for reference purposes only. The Louisiana Office of Community Development makes no claim as to the veracity or accuracy of any views contained herein.

As This Town Slips into Sea, a $48 Million Rescue Runs into Obstacles

There was a fight coming and everyone knew it, so the reverend asked his guests to start with a prayer. "Dear Lord, here we gather to consider ways and means that we might be relocated," began Roch Naquin, who lives in Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana a town slipping into the sea and the site of a radical federal policy experiment. 
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Sites for Relocating island residents narrowed to three

Isle de Jean Charles residents and state officials have narrowed possible relocation sites for the community to three in the Schriever area.
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First US climate change refugees prepare to relocate in louisiana

Rising sea levels attributed to climate change is forcing a whole American town to relocate, and many others may soon have to follow. In January the US Government announced it would spend $63 million to help residents of Isle de Jean Charles in the southern state of Louisiana to move from their homes as coastal erosion threatens to sink the entire community.
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Tactical retreat? As seas rise, Louisiana faces hard choices

Growing up in the small bayou town of Pointe-Aux-Chenes, Reggie Dupre has always considered the residents of the neighboring Isle de Jean Charles community as something like a step-family. with only about 10 miles of bayou separating them in Terrebonne Parish, he would go to the same churches and schools as them. They even shared a voting precinct. 
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CSRS to design new community for first U.S. 'climate refugees'

State officials have selected Baton Rouge-based CSRS Inc. to design a new community for residents of Isle de Jean Charles, who last year became the first "climate refugees" in the U.S.
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exploring higher ground: honoring tribal tradition in louisiana's climate resettlement plan

In anticipation of the Tribe's iminent resettlement from their ancestral land along the coast of Louisiana, in January 2017 the Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe gathered for a pivotal community workshop, with support from the Citizen's Institute on Rural Design.
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for 'climate relocation,' the dollar math is hardly settled

ISLE de JEAN CHARLES, La. – The Gulf of Mexico has been closing in on Rita Falgout's native soil for all of her 81 years. Now the island that has been her home is just a thin spit of land – the last 320 of what was once 22,000 acres being chewed away by the surrounding waters. 
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beyond the beltway: louisiana isle home to the first us climate refugees

The world's second biggest emitter of greenhouse gases is expected to walk away from the Paris Climate Accord. How will U.S. President Trump's decision affect the world and the people in his own country? CGTN's Sean Calleb's went to the tip of the southern U.S. state of Louisiana to look at the impact of rising tides for our series Beyond the Beltway.
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those who remain on this island in louisiana's bayou are barely clinging to what's left

Since the middle of the last century more than 90 percent of Isle de Jean Charles has dissolved into the southern Louisiana bayou. The state predicts sea level rise and rampant coastal erosion will make the island unlivable in the coming years. 
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