In the News

The stories of Isle de Jean Charles and the National Disaster Resilience Competition have been covered by media, professionals and academics alike.
The links below represent many viewpoints, aggregated here for reference purposes only. The Louisiana Office of Community Development makes no claim as to the veracity or accuracy of any views contained herein.

saving coastal communities requires a community-based approach

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma exposed how vulnerable our communities are to extreme climate events. With the two storms destroying thousands of houses and causing well over $200 billion worth of losses, questions have been raised, particularly about how we don't seem to be doing enough to move homes out of harm's way.
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exploring higher ground: honoring tribal tradition in louisiana's climate resettlement plan

In anticipation of the Tribe's iminent resettlement from their ancestral land along the coast of Louisiana, in January 2017 the Isle de Jean Charles Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe gathered for a pivotal community workshop, with support from the Citizen's Institute on Rural Design.
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CSRS to design new community for first U.S. 'climate refugees'

State officials have selected Baton Rouge-based CSRS Inc. to design a new community for residents of Isle de Jean Charles, who last year became the first "climate refugees" in the U.S.
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Tactical retreat? As seas rise, Louisiana faces hard choices

Growing up in the small bayou town of Pointe-Aux-Chenes, Reggie Dupre has always considered the residents of the neighboring Isle de Jean Charles community as something like a step-family. with only about 10 miles of bayou separating them in Terrebonne Parish, he would go to the same churches and schools as them. They even shared a voting precinct. 
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Sites for Relocating island residents narrowed to three

Isle de Jean Charles residents and state officials have narrowed possible relocation sites for the community to three in the Schriever area.
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As This Town Slips into Sea, a $48 Million Rescue Runs into Obstacles

There was a fight coming and everyone knew it, so the reverend asked his guests to start with a prayer. "Dear Lord, here we gather to consider ways and means that we might be relocated," began Roch Naquin, who lives in Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana a town slipping into the sea and the site of a radical federal policy experiment. 
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First US climate change refugees prepare to relocate in louisiana

Rising sea levels attributed to climate change is forcing a whole American town to relocate, and many others may soon have to follow. In January the US Government announced it would spend $63 million to help residents of Isle de Jean Charles in the southern state of Louisiana to move from their homes as coastal erosion threatens to sink the entire community.
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An Island in Louisiana's Bayou is Vanishing; And its residents are fleeing to higher ground

Since the middle of the last century more than 90 percent of Isle de Jean Charleshas dissolved into the southern Louisiana bayou. The island, which is connected to the outside world by a road that's known to flood in perfect weather, is home to a tribe of Native americans who have fished and hunted there since the 1800s.
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Facing Climate Change on the Louisiana Bayous—in pictures

Isle de Jean Charles in Louisiana is home to a Native American community who fished, hunted, trapped and farmed the land. But since 1955, more than 90% of the island's original land mass has washed away, the loss caused by logging, oil exploration, hurricanes and ineffective flood control.
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