In the News

The stories of Isle de Jean Charles and the National Disaster Resilience Competition have been covered by media, professionals and academics alike.
The links below represent many viewpoints, aggregated here for reference purposes only. The Louisiana Office of Community Development makes no claim as to the veracity or accuracy of any views contained herein.

Federal Report: Climate change increases odds of severe weather, expensive mitigation in Louisiana

A warming planet means residents of the southeastern United States can expect more severe hurricanes and floods, according to a report involving 13 federal agencies and more than 300 experts. 
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Confronting the Costs of Coastal Land Loss

The Louisiana coast is disappearing, acres of land eroding away every day. It’s a well known fact, which for years has prompted commissions, studies and development of new infrastructure to rechannel Mississippi River sediment back into the wetlands where it is needed.
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Don't Label Them Climate Change Refugees, Says a Louisiana Planner, They're Pioneers

In Louisiana, real estate is a commodity. According to the state's Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, more than 1,900 square miles have been lost since the 1930s, and an additional 4,120 square miles could be lost over the next 50 years. 
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Prospects Are Looking Up for This Gulf Coast Tribe Relocating to Higher Ground

As Louisiana’s Isle de Jean Charles slips away, the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw tribe plans community renewal and a museum for their new home. 
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'Climate refugees': Gulf Coast isle becomes test case with push to relocate residents


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Louisiana's Managed Retreat: Isle de Jean Charles


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forced to move: climate change already displacing u.s. communities

The role of climate change in human displacement and migration is being cited by experts as the number one global threat of the 21st century. 
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america's first climate change refugees are preparing to leave an island that will disappear under the sea in the next few years

ISLE DE JEAN CHARLES, Louisiana -- America comes to an end here. Connected to the marshes and moss-laced bayous of southern Louisiana by two miles of narrow causeway, waters lapping high on eah side, Isle de Jean charles takes you as far into the Gulf of Mexico as you can go without falling in. But the dolour in the salt air is not just about loneliness and separation. It's about impending doom.
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the perils of climate migration: a cautionary tale from louisiana

Once a sprawling island, Isle de Jean Charles today is a mere sliver of what it used to be, more than 98 percent of its land has been swept into the Gulf of Mexico over the past 60 years by an increase in severe storms and rising seas. It's why the tiny community was awarded the first-of-its-kind $48.3 million federal grant in 2016 to resettle further inland.
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